Book of Matthew Explained

Go To Matthew Index

The Gospel of St. Matthew was written by Matthew.  The key word in Matthew is "fulfilled", as we have been looking at the prophecies being fulfilled.  Matthew was also called Levi. Matthew was one of the twelve apostles.  Most people agree he was a Roman tax collector. Matthew was hated by the publicans, and they criticized Jesus for eating with him.  When Jesus called him, he left the tax tables and followed Jesus.

In the first chapter of Matthew, we see the complete genealogy of Jesus Christ.  In Matthew, we see Jesus as the promised Messiah if you will, The Lion of the tribe of Judah.

If we were to think of a theme for this book, we would say its purpose would be to show Jesus as a fulfillment of that promised Messiah (His Kingship)."Gospel" means good news, and certainly this book of Matthew is a book of good news.

Verses 1-2: “The book of the generation”: The genealogy of Christ opens with a statement similar to the various divisions of the Book of Genesis (showing the unity of the Scriptures). “Jesus Christ” is a title most often used of the Savior, Jesus (Greek Iesous; Hebrew Yehoshua) is His earthly name, meaning “Savior.” Christos is the Greek translation for “Messiah” or “Anointed.” Technically: Jesus the Christ.

As you read some of the names in the genealogy, you will note some of difference in the spelling of the names here and in the Old Testament. Most of this is caused because of the difference in the Greek and Hebrew languages.

“Son of David”: By tracing Jesus’ ancestry back to King David, through the line of Davidic kings, Matthew connects Jesus with His royal heritage. The genealogy here is that of Joseph, Jesus’ legal father, whereas the genealogy of (Luke 3:23-38), is that of Mary, His actual parent, showing His bloodline back to David. The author’s purpose is to show that the messianic promises made to David’s line are fulfilled in Jesus.

“Son of Abraham:” He is also the fulfillment of the covenant promises to Abraham, the forefather of the Jews (Genesis 12:3; 13:15; 22:18). Since Matthew is writing primarily to Jewish readers, he naturally begins by emphasizing Jesus’ Jewish parentage.

Each of the chapters are done individually. Some due to length, have been shorten into "continued" sections. Each section contains a questionnaire which follows the section which has been done to aid in the learning process. Each section can be accessed by the simple menu found at the bottom of the file. (i.e., continue to next section or return to previous section.

Matthew Chapter 1 Matthew Chapter 9 Matthew Chapter 16 Continued Matthew Chapter 24
Matthew Chapter 2 Matthew Chapter 9 Continued Matthew Chapter 17 Matthew Chapter 24 Continued
Matthew Chapter 3 Matthew Chapter 10 Matthew Chapter 17 Continued Matthew Chapter 24 Second Continued
Matthew Chapter 4 Matthew Chapter 10 Continued Matthew Chapter 18 Matthew Chapter 24 Third Continued
Matthew Chapter 4 Continued Matthew Chapter 11 Matthew Chapter 18 Continued Matthew Chapter 25
Matthew Chapter 5 Matthew Chapter 12 Matthew Chapter 19 Matthew Chapter 25 Continued
Matthew Chapter 5 Continued Matthew Chapter 12 Continued Matthew Chapter 19 Continued Matthew Chapter 25 Second Continued
Matthew Chapter 5 Second Continued Matthew Chapter 13 Matthew Chapter 20 Matthew Chapter 26
Matthew Chapter 6 Matthew Chapter 13 Continued Matthew Chapter 21 Matthew Chapter 26 Continued
Matthew Chapter 6 Continued Matthew Chapter 13 Second Continued Matthew Chapter 21 Continued Matthew Chapter 26 Second Continued
Matthew Chapter 7 Matthew Chapter 14 Matthew Chapter 22 Matthew Chapter 26 Third Continued
Matthew Chapter 7 Continued Matthew Chapter 15 Matthew Chapter 22 Continued Matthew Chapter 27
Matthew Chapter 8 Matthew Chapter 15 Continued Matthew Chapter 23 Matthew Chapter 27 Continued
Matthew Chapter 8 Continued Matthew Chapter 16 Matthew Chapter 23 Continued Matthew Chapter 28

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